Drafting Resources

 

Title Blocks

A-Size Title Block

 

 

B-Size Title Block

 

 

 

 

Centering a Three View Drawing

Determine the Overall Dimensions of the object you are about to draw.

Overall Height  ___________

Overall Width   ___________

Overall Depth   ___________

 

 

Find the size of the Horizontal Spacing

Horizontal Space Available

Determine the Horizontal Space Available from one border line to the other. 

                               _________________

 

Horizontal Space Used  (Width + Depth)

Subtract the Horizontal Space Used from the Horizontal Space Available.

      (Subtract) - _________________

Divide answer by three spaces

By dividing your answer by 3 you can be certain that the gaps between your views will be equal.

/ 3 spaces

Horizontal Spacing                  ___________

Round answer to nearest 16th of an inch, this will be the size of your spaces.

 

Find the size of the Vertical Spacing

Vertical Space Available

Determine the Vertical Space Available from one border line to the other. 

                            ___________________

  Vertical Space Used   (Height + Depth)

Subtract the Vertical Space Used from the Vertical Space Available.

 

         (Subtract) - _________________

 

Divide answer by three spaces

By dividing your answer by 3 you can be certain that the gaps between your views will be equal.

/ 3 spaces

Vertical Spacing                      ___________

Round answer to nearest 16th of an inch, this will be the size of your spaces.

 

 

 

 

Centering an Isometric Drawing

Step 1:

Determine the overall Height Width and Depth of the object about to be drawn.

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2:

Use the cross diagonal method to find the center of the workspace.  To do this, simply draw an X from the four corners of the workspace crossing in the middle.

Step 3:

From the center of your drawing, draw a vertical line down of the overall Height of the object.

Step 4:

From the end of the line in Step 3, draw a line 30O down and to the left of the overall Depth of the object.

Step 5:

From the end of the line in Step 4, draw a line 30O down and to the right of the overall Width of the object.

Step 6:

From this point you can start the drawing by first Boxing in the object.  The starting point is the lowest corner of the box.

 

 

Auxiliary Views

An Incline Plane is normally seen as an Edge in one view and as a Foreshortened Plane in the other, thus no True Size and Shape of the Plane can be established with the six standard Orthographic Views.  Therefore, the purpose of an Auxiliary View is to show the True Size and Shape of an Inclined Plane.  The view is created by projecting points from the Edge View and by referencing dimensions from an Adjacent View. 

Step 1

          Identify both the Edge View and the Reference Dimension

The Edge View is the view where the inclined surface is seen as an edge

The Reference View can be any view adjacent to the Edge View.  In the adjacent views you will find the Reference Dimension. 

The Reference Dimension is the one dimension not found in the Edge View.

 

Step 2

          Placement of Reference Line

The Reference Line is used to help transfer dimensions from one view to the next.

The Reference Line is placed perpendicular to the Reference Dimension generally along the longest edge of the foreshortened plane or placed symmetrically.

A Reference Line is also placed in the Auxiliary View parallel to the edge of the inclined surface.

Step 3

Project all Points

All points are projected perpendicular to the Inclined Plane, from the Edge View, to the Auxiliary View.

*Note: For a Partial Auxiliary View only the points on the Inclined surface need to be projected.

 

Step 4

Transfer Points

Points are transferred from the Reference View to the Auxiliary View in the following manner.

In the Reference View measure from the Reference Line to the desired point.

***NOTE:  All measurements must be made perpendicular to the Reference Line.***

Follow the projection lines from the point to the Edge View and then over to the Auxiliary View.

Now place the point in the Auxiliary View, using the Reference Line as a guide.

Repeat this process until all points are accounted for. 

 

Step 5

          Connect Points

Once all points have been established Connect points accordingly to finish the view.

Remember that all parallel lines remain parallel.

Label your views, Auxiliary Views are named by the Dimension that they Reference.

 

 

 

True Size and Shape of an Oblique Plane

Step1

Recognize that no edge view of the plane is found in the normal Front, Top, or Right Side View of the object.

 

Step 2

Locate a line on the plane Parallel to the a Reference Plane Line.  If there is no line, then you must create one.

Construct a Line (C,C1) in the Top View Parallel to the Horizontal Reference Plane Line (H). 

 

Step 3

Create a True Length View of Line C,C1 by projecting both points to the Frontal Plane.

Step 4

Place an Auxiliary Reference Plane Line (A) perpendicular to the True Length Line (TL) of C,C1.

Step 5

Complete the Primary Auxiliary View. (Create an Edge View of Plane ABC)

The distance from the Horizontal Reference Plane Line (H) to Point B in the Top View, is Equal to the distance from the Auxiliary Reference Plane Line (A) to Point B in the Primary Auxiliary View.  The same is true for all other points.

Notice how a Point View of C, C1 is created.

Step 6

Construct a Secondary Auxiliary View.

Place a Secondary Reference Plane Line (Sec) parallel to the Edge View (EV) of the plane.

Project Points A, B, and C perpendicular to the Secondary Reference Plane Line, into the Secondary Auxiliary View. 

The distance from the Primary Reference Plane Line (A) to Point B in the Front View, is equal to the distance from the Secondary Reference Plane Line (Sec) to Point B in the Secondary Auxiliary View.  

Congratulations!!!  A True Size and Shape (TSS) View of Plane ABC has been created.